Facebook Ads: What’s Your Angle of Approach?

By ,

120 SHARES

Does anyone remember the DeBeers Right Hand Ring campaign from like, 10 years ago?

Instead of continuously pitching diamonds for engagement rings, DeBeers thought they’d try another angle of approach for their product: why not pitch the “I bought it for myself to celebrate my independence and success“ aspect of diamond rings?

So they did, and the results were impressive:

  • The campaign increased diamond sales 15% industry wide for the first half of 2003 despite the Iraq war and the outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (aka SARS).
  • Additionally, the campaign won a Gold EFFIE (for effective marketing) in 2005 for “exceeding its objectives of bringing ring growth into line with total diamond jewelry growth”
  • Furthermore, the campaign gained 39 percent product awareness among consumers, specifically single women

Why not do the same thing for your Facebook campaigns?

And by that I mean, try a different angle of approach in pitching your product or service. Here’s a perfect example I found on my own Facebook wall:

 

Facebook gardening ad

 

Yard work isn’t normally pitched as a gift. It’s something most people grudgingly spend money on to remove an annoying chore off of our to-do lists.

But isn’t the ad intriguing?

First, what a great freakin’ photo!

Second, the headline, with it’s intriguing twist of yard work as gift really captures the imagination and demands a read-through of the copy.

Third, the price point is just about perfect for a surprise gift for someone who might be on vacation that week, or coming up on a birthday celebration or something.

The only downside to the ad is the timing — they’re advertising this in the dead of winter? Really suck timing for anyone who doesn’t live in Miami.

Still, it remains a great ad and a perfect example of taking a new angle of approach for pitching your service.

And if a yard services company can do it, so can you.

ACO_endad_Secrets

Twitter Facebook LinkedIn Google+ Email Print More
  • http://www.eBizROI.com Rick Noel, eBiz ROI, Inc.

    Excellent examples of creating demand, both in terms of the diamond example, then the Facebook example. Marketing is all about creating demand in my definition. Positioning lawn care as an affordable gift is both creative and brilliant, but given the season, maybe some geo-targeting might be in order :-)