PPC News Roundup for January 30, 2008

  • Now you can get simple Google analytics help through WebmasterWorld forums! Search Engine Roundtable posts that an analytics advisor has volunteered to help people out with the Google analytics questions from time to time. Apparently he knows analytics inside and out, and also knows how to listen to users.
  • Andy Komack from KoMarketing Associates has a great post discussing 5 Keyword Strategies for B2B PPC Campaigns. Some include focusing only on highly targeted keywords and using a thorough list of negative keywords.
  • Apollo SEM recently discovered that Google had changed it’s auto-tagging feature, rendering their “AdWords search query hack” useless. My favorite response to this so far: Google IS Evil.
  • The guys over at the Rimm-Kaufman blog have been really busy this past week putting out great content. The first was the announcement of their new tool, RKG Duck, that allows you to manipulate data in Windows apps via the Clipboard. Then they followed that announcement with a filter that can automatically group similar keywords together! Just when I thought things couldn’t get any better, they wrote the article, “Ad Groups as a Barrier to Success.” This piece is an interesting point of view on how the PPC search engines utilize ad groups in campaign structure. The author, George, states that “forcing all terms into neat campaigns and AdGroups limits flexibility.”
  • Sick of hearing about landing pages? Too bad! They are too important to your paid search efforts not to talk about! Did you know that something as simple as using highly-targeted headlines on your landing pages can have a dramatic impact on your conversion rate? Vishen over at MindValley Labs lays it all out for you in this interesting article.
  • Can graphical call-to-action buttons decrease your conversion rate? I don’t know if there is a rule that backs this up. Results will vary depending on the audience. However, to read about how call-to-action buttons can affect your conversion rate, check out this article.
  • When reviewing a new client’s paid search accounts you need to be careful: don’t just outright tell them that they are doing everything wrong. More-than-likely your main contact will be the individual who was previously running the accounts and you don’t want to insult them. Sure, since they hired you they are probably aware that their accounts need an overhaul, but Greg over at SEM Geek has given some tips on cushioning your feedback in regards to their current efforts.