AdWords Dynamic Remarketing – Oh The Possibilities

By , Senior Account Manager, Community

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It’s no secret that I’m a huge fan of AdWords Dynamic Remarketing as I’ve seen this type of campaign produce amazing results for my clients. The ability to showcase the products visitors viewed as they traverse Google’s Display Network is powerful.

 

In trying to capitalize even further, I’ve put together a list of Dynamic Remarketing audience combinations I’d like to try. I’ve also listed the potential pros and cons of each combination.

 

Managed Placement Dynamic Remarketing

 

With Dynamic Remarketing you show product specific ads to visitors who have already been to your site, but what if you chose the sites upon which these ads are served? For example, let’s say you sell football equipment. Using Google’s Display Planner you can research football related placements (see image below). Your campaign would then only target visitors who have been to your site and who visit the specific placements you choose.

Image of Display Network placements

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pros – Theoretically, you’ll be hitting your most qualified shoppers. Having already been to your site AND visiting a highly relevant placement could mean the shopper is further down the funnel.

 

Cons – Depending on the placement, you may have to bid higher to ensure exposure on the site. Additionally, if you tier your Dynamic Remarketing campaigns this campaign should receive the higher bid (as it’s more targeted). You may end up spending more on traffic that you might have received anyway.

 

Threshold Dynamic Remarketing

 

The idea behind threshold Dynamic Remarketing is to only show ads to visitors who viewed products costing over a certain price. Perhaps you don’t see any profit from products that cost $100 or less. You would create an audience using the “ecomm_totalvalue” variable.

 

Image of threshold remarketing list

 

On the flip side, you would create another audience targeting visitors where “ecomm_totalvalue” is less than or equal to $99. Finally, you would create a custom combination that targets shoppers who have viewed products costing at least $100 and excludes those viewing products that cost $99 or less.

 

Pros – With this type of targeting you hit only those visitors with the potential to have a higher average order value (AOV). In this case, it may be okay to bid more aggressively than a standard Dynamic Remarketing campaign because the risk is worth the reward.

 

Cons – Even though you target higher AOV products, you may significantly cut out many of your visitors. Remember, our combination only targets visitors who don’t view any $99 or fewer products. A visitor who viewed five $100+ product pages and only one product page under $99 would still be excluded under these targeting parameters. Even if you don’t use the combination and only target the $100+ audience, you still miss out on potential customers.

 

Timed Dynamic Remarketing

 

In the early stages of Dynamic Remarketing, we built audiences around actions and time frames. For example, you could target visitors who added a product to their shopping cart within the last thirty days. Or, visitors who viewed a product page within the last fifteen days. You could then tier your audiences so those further down the funnel received the highest bids. With Google setting up predefined audiences, you can still tier your bids but you can’t change the membership duration of thirty days. Thus, you must setup your own Dynamic Remarketing audiences in order to set different durations.

 

Pros – The value of tiered bidding by time interval and action is huge. Bid higher on your most interested visitors while still continuing to hit potential shoppers further down the line. Much like regular remarketing, you can also show converted visitors a selection of products down the line. For example, someone may buy a sixty-day supply of K-Cups. After that sixty days, start showing Dynamic Remarketing ads to encourage that person to buy again.

 

Cons – It isn’t necessarily a con, but time frames will need to be tested. You may run a couple campaigns that don’t show desired results, forcing you to try different time frames and bids.

 

Conclusion

 

Dynamic Remarketing has proven effective, but I believe we’ve only grazed the surface. Over the coming months I will be testing these combinations and sharing my results.

 

Are there any Dynamic Remarketing combinations you’ve tested or want to try? Leave a comment below.

 

For More on AdWords Remarketing, Read:

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  • Philip Sonneveldt

    Great article, thanks for the insights! The only problem I encounter is that I don’t see the [ecomm_totalvalue contains] when I want to segment or target a specific remarketing audience like you do. So could you perhaps take me step-by-step by configuring these dynamic parameters in your AdWords audiences? Would be awesome, thanks in advance!

    Edit: or are they automaticly being implemented when the tag is placed and connected with the product ID, pages et cetera?

    • Matthew Umbro

      Hi Philip,

      Thanks for reading! “ecomm_totalvalue” is actually all you’ll need. Once you’ve set that rule you can set any additional parameters you would like. You will need to implement the code before you see this option in AdWords. Hope this helps!

      -Matt

      • Philip Sonneveldt

        Most certain! Thanks for your quick reply, I’m going to test it! :)

  • http://www.inbounddan.com/ Inbound Dan

    It’s nice to see someone else sharing the same passion for dynamic remarketing, and I agree that we’ve only just started to see the real potential of this amazing feature. My guide to dynamic remarketing is looking to evolve as we go and I’d love to hear everyone’s thoughts: http://www.inbounddan.com/dynamic-remarketing-guide-for-ecommerce/