PPC News Roundup for January 16, 2008

  • Over at optimizeandprophesize.com, Jonathon Mendez has a list of the top 10 multivariate & A/B testing results from 2007. Most of the A/B split testing goes into detail on landing pages and conversion data. Some tests include a single product converting better over a choice of three, long scroll text and different calls to action on your landing page, which could also be used in your PPC ad text.
  • Dave Davis at RedFly Marketing talks about 7 ways to find and expand your negative keyword list. He highlights points such as using your own analytics to find negative keywords, using basic tools like Google’s keyword tool which will suggest potential negative keywords for you and a basic thesaurus out of Microsoft word.
  • What’s your highest click-through rate? Search Engine Roundtable talks about a WebmasterWorld thread in which polls people about their highest click-through-rate when using Google Adwords. While some people have higher CTR’s than others, they also point out many factors that determine your CTR.
  • Have you noticed Yahoo’s Search Assist within their search query? It is a little tool that helps users refine or better define their search query. It’s actually pretty helpful! But as a search marketer, how will this affect my search campaigns – and how can I leverage this new tool to aid my campaign? Mary Anne Boyle at Search Insider has helpful tips on this topic.
  • David Vogelpohl posed an interesting theory on Marketing Pilgrim. Ask.com is a member of Google’s Search Network, but they seem to be showing these ads on their own contextual advertising network in a sort of “back door arbitrage.” Is this really the case?
  • Even if you don’t advertise for a well-known brand, it can pay off to use keyword misspellings of your brand name. In this post, Jennifer Slegg explains why you should bid on your brand name’s misspellings to ensure that your competition doesn’t capitalize on your traffic!
  • PPC copy changes can hurt you: at least that’s what the Rimm-Kaufmann blog is saying! This post does a great job of explaining why too much copy-tinkering can be a bad thing, and offers suggestions for the right time to make changes.